Sunday, May 07, 2006

Details Linger at the Threshold of Perception

I've been thinking about titling paintings and photographs. I don't do it normally, since most of my work ends up in a hotel lobby where nobody cares about the name. When I do use titles I like to steal them. Is that wrong? I like phrases, groups of words that mean nothing out of context. Actually they don't always mean anything at all. I like song lyrics, too. The title of this post came from a review of an artist's work, it's on the LACDA.com website. It just sounds interesting, a good title for a painting, or a photo like the one shown here.

I've been working very hard in my yard today. I snipped, pruned, dug up, dug out and planted. Standing across the street looking at my house I think that my neighbors must be very happy with me. The result bears witness to "less is more".

I got an email from a designer today - yes on Sunday! She's in California, but working on a Dallas hotel project where the owners are insisting on using local artists. That's where I come in. She likes my work. I've sent off pricing and more images. I love doing local projects, it doesn't happen that often. Dallas is blessed with a good business climate and three major high end hotel projects are under construction right now: The W, Ritz Carlton, and Hotel Palomar. I hope one of those is hers.

2 comments:

KJ said...

Glad you explained that title... thought you'd gotten a new religion or something. Is that a pic of your revised landscape? You really nailed the 'less is more' look! (just kidding!) Which, btw, is also my preference for naming paintings... one word titles keep me sane. Have been told the most overused title is 'Reflections'... knew you'd want to know.

Bee said...

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